Hitchhiking Siberia: The Cold Night, The Sunset and The Euphoria

The Hitchhiking Trip to Siberia – 2009
On the road from Ulan-Ude to Moscow
Part Five

On the Road from Ulan-Ude to Moscow: Part One
On the Road from Ulan-Ude to Moscow: Part Two
On the Road from Ulan-Ude to Moscow: Part Three
On the Road from Ulan-Ude to Moscow: Part Four

February 17, 2009. Me and the driver were sitting in the cabin of the truck, drinking the last cups of tea we had left. After several attempts to start the engine the accumulator was discharged, and now we couldn’t warm the cabin anymore. Pretty soon it was just as cold as outside. The driver called to his fellow worker and described our situation. Then he turned to me and said, “Now all we have to do is wait and talk. If we fall asleep, we may die.” And so we kept talking and talking in the cold of the night, until his workmate arrived around 6.35 AM. Realizing it may take long to bring the engine back to life, they contacted other drivers on the road via radio transmitter to find someone who could take me towards Omsk. By 8.30 AM I was already talking to the driver of a tractor with an auto-transport semi-trailer. Upon hearing my story of where am I hitchhiking from, he swore for five minutes.


We passed the city of Omsk by noon. I was dropped off right after we left the city limits. In 30 minutes I got a ride to Krasniy Yar from a young guy, who left me by the road police station. I noticed a small roadside café not far from the place, so I walked there to fill the thermos with hot water and to eat something as I was starving. When I went back to the road, it was already around 2.00 PM. A ‘Freightliner’ truck picked me up.
“I’m driving to Noyabrsk,” said Alexey, the driver.
“I’m hitchhiking to Moscow,” said I and jumped in.
“I used to hitchhike a lot when I was young. And also did 500 km long trips on my bicycle,” he continued. And we shared our hitchhiking experiences and stories from the road.

At 4.00 PM we made a stop. Alexey wanted to eat. And I just had a cup of hot tea with lemon. The sign on the teapot said, “Hot Water: 10 rubles per one thermos. Money goes to the church.” In twenty minutes we left the café. Back in the cabin of the truck I realized that I caught cold. But as long as it wasn’t too bad, I could continue my trip. Around 6.30 PM the driver dropped me off on the Berdyuzhye junction. I walked along the road in search of a suitable spot and soon began to hitchhike. Then there was the sunset. The best sunset I have ever witnessed. And I laughed, and cried, and jumped, and danced, trying to imitate Michael Jackson’s moonwalk. Then the felling of euphoria I was overwhelmed by was replaced with the feeling of solitude. And then there was silence. And happiness again.

It was past 6.00 PM when another truck driver picked me up.
“Can I go with you towards Chelyabinsk?” I asked.
“I can take you all the way to Ufa. I have to be there by morning the receive cargo, and I am already running late,” said the 27 y.o. driver. He was from Ukraine. Very kind and funny guy, who was talking and joking all the way. By 8.00 PM we were already in Kurgansk region, driving towards Chelyabinsk, and 3 hours later the city of Kurgansk was left behind.

The Hitchhiking Trip to Siberia – 2009
On the road from Moscow to Irkutsk:
Part One // Part Two // Part Three // Part Four // Part Five // Part Six

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6 thoughts on “Hitchhiking Siberia: The Cold Night, The Sunset and The Euphoria

  1. Pingback: Hitchhiking Siberia: The Corrupted Police and The Three Hitchhikers « On The Road

  2. Pingback: Hitchhiking Siberia: The Robbery Attempt, The Café Village and The End « On The Road

  3. Pingback: The Siberian Hitchhiking Trip – 2009 « On The Road

  4. Pingback: The Siberian Hitchhiking Trip – 2009 | On The Road

  5. Pingback: Hitchhiking Siberia: The Robbery Attempt, The Café Village and The End | On The Road

  6. Pingback: Hitchhiking Siberia: The Corrupted Police and The Three Hitchhikers | On The Road

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