Iran Journey 2015: How to get to Masuleh

Founded in the 10th century AD, the village of Masuleh is located about 70 km southwest of Rasht in the mountains of Alborz. Nestled on the side of the mountain at an elevation of 1050 meters above sea level, the town itself has an elevation difference of about 100 meters. And what makes Masuleh unique is that the roofs of the houses are actually serving as streets and courtyards. As people say, the yard of the building above is the roof the one below.

Read the full text about our visit to Masuleh

How we got there:
We visited Masuleh on a car with our friend who drove us there from Rasht via the town of Fuman (make sure to try Fuman’s famous pastry – kuluche fuman). The information below was shared by people from Iran (and Rasht, particularly) whom I asked for the easiest ways to get to Masuleh.
Information on how to get to the Lake Urmia in Iran, how to get to Masuleh, hitchhiking to Masuleh, taxi to Masuleh, Masouleh

Continue reading

Advertisements

Iran Journey 2015. Photographs: The Village of Masuleh

The historical town of Masuleh in Gilan province of Iran, founded in the 10th century AD, is located about 70 km southwest of Rasht in the mountains of Alborz. The old village of Masuleh (Old Masuleh, or Kohne Masuhel in Persian), which was located about 6 kilometers northwest of the present-day town, was founded around 1006 AD. But an epidemic disease as well as attacks from neighboring villages and towns forced the inhabitants to move to the current location. Nestled on the side of the mountain at an elevation of 1050 meters above sea level, the town itself has an elevation difference of about 100 meters. And what makes Masuleh unique is that the roofs of the houses are actually serving as streets and courtyards. As people say, the yard of the building above is the roof the one below.

Read about our visit to the village of Masuleh || How to get to the village of Masuleh
The historical village of Masuleh, Gilan province, Iran
Continue reading

Iran Journey 2015. Photographs: Bandar-e Anzali

Tired and exhausted from the previous day’s hitchhiking trip from Tabriz to the city of Rasht, we sleep until noon. And after the late breakfast, as our friend returns home, we leave Rasht to visit Bandar-e Anzali, a harbour town on the shores of the Caspian Sea in the Gilan province of Iran. Translated from Persian, “bandar” means a port. Known as Bandar-e Pahlavi before the Islamic Revolution, the city was founded in the early 19th century. The Anzali lagoon divides the city into two parts. In May 1920, the Russians occupied Bandar-e Aznali and declared a Soviet Republic of Gilan (officially known as the Persian Socialist Soviet Republic), which existed only until September 1921.

The city of Bandar-e Anzali, Gilan province, Iran

Continue reading

Iran Journey 2015: Bandar-e Anzali. On the Shores of the Caspian Sea

Monday, November 16, 2015. Tired and exhausted from the previous day’s hitchhiking trip from Tabriz to the city of Rasht, we sleep until noon. And after the late breakfast, as our friend returns home, we leave Rasht to visit Bandar-e Anzali, a harbour town on the shores of the Caspian Sea in the Gilan province of Iran. Translated from Persian, “bandar” means a port. Known as Bandar-e Pahlavi before the Islamic Revolution, the city was founded in the early 19th century. The Anzali lagoon divides the city into two parts. In May 1920, the Russians occupied Bandar-e Aznali and declared a Soviet Republic of Gilan (officially known as the Persian Socialist Soviet Republic), which existed only until September 1921.
The city of Bandar-e Anzali, Gilan province, Iran, 2015

Continue reading

Iran Journey 2015: Hitchhiking from Tabriz to Rasht

Read Nane’s version in Armenian

Sunday, November 15, 2015. We leave Tabriz early in the morning. It’s sad to say goodbye to our host family, but the Road is calling and we need to continue our journey. A dear friend is waiting for us in the city of Rasht, about 650 kilometers away. From the city center, we take a BRT bus and get to the outskirts of Tabriz. We start hitchhiking on the highway right after the row of shared taxis, whose drivers are hunting passengers. A car stops in about 2-3 minutes, and while I talk to the driver trying to explain what we want from him, a girl named Farzan approaches Nane. Turns out, her father noticed us as they passed by, and since she speaks English, he sent her to ask if the tourists, us that is, need any help. They suggest to take us to a police check point about 10-15 kilometers down the road. “It will be easier to get a ride from there,” he says as we get into their car. “Do you like Iran?” they ask a little after. And when we answer that we do like Iran very much, they ask, surprised: “Why?” And they complain about hard life without freedom and mention that they would like to emigrate to another country for a better life.
On the road from Tabriz to Rasht, hitchhiking in Iran

Continue reading